Dear Film,   We had a good run but  ALEXA has stolen my heart.   Love always, RD
Master Cinematographer Roger Deakins, ASC has shot a lot of wonderful films on, well, film of course. Amongst them are personal favourites of mine; No Country for Old Men, O Brother Where art Thou?, The Shawshank Redemption. Aside from his general level of greatness, Mr. Deakins has also been nominated 9 times for cinematography at the Oscars; and yet, he awaits a golden statue. WTH?
Yea, the man knoweth of what he speaks when it comes to cinematography. So, it’s a wee bit of a surprise that he’s not keen to continue shooting on film, but rather looks forward to more time with his beloved  Arri ALEXA digital camera on future projects. Whoa.

Hopping on over to Deakins’ personal site, you’ll find his take on Arri’s ALEXA:

“The Arri specs on the Alexa seem totally honest and accurate. I was testing the camera & found it to be the first digital camera to produce an image with the resolution and range as one captured on film.”

“It’s the first camera I’ve worked with that I’ve felt gives me something I can’t get on film. Whether I’ll shoot on film again, I don’t know. Shooting on digital gives me a lot more options. It’s got more latitude, it’s got better color rendition. It’s faster. I can immediately see what I’m recording. I can time that image on set with a color-calibrated monitor.”  On film:  “I mean, it’s had a good run, hasn’t it?”

Telling it like it is, Master Cinematographer Roger Deakins discusses his views on shooting  digital versus film in this interview with /Film.com.


I suggest a jump to /Film for that afore mentioned interview, if for nothing else than to clarify the context of his statements above. Deakins is surprisingly humble and forthright about his art, filmmaking technology, and the importance of getting the best work done with the resources at hand.

In addition, a closing quote from Master Cinematographer Roger Deakins:

Cinematography is more than a camera, whether that camera is a Red, an Alexa or a Bolex. There is a little more to it than resolution, colour depth, latitude, grain structure, lens aberration etc, etc. The lenses use for ‘Citizen Kane’ were in no way as good as a Primo or a Master Prime and the grain structure in that film is, frankly, all over the place.    But the cinematography?    Well, you tell me.

If your appetite for fantastic cinematography is whetted, goggle below; Roger Deakins reflects on  shooting the Cohen Bro’s TRUE GRIT— fantastic stuff.


Got feedback? Share your thoughts; film over digital cameras-

http://www.rogerdeakins.com/

Roger Deakins Interview- Collider.com

The Hot button- Film interviews galore.

Link:  Deakins Hearts Alexa – FreshDV

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