You’ve got an iPad, a short attention span and the inclination to create a 3D model.

Who you gonna call?

Swing by the Apple App store and grab this little wonder to solve your iPad / portable 3D modelling needs, Micheal L. Farrell’s  Verto Studio 3D.

The results of what could only have been a lot of effort from  software developer Micheal L. Farrell. Verto Studio 3D is a an application that’s ballsy enough for pro’s and simple enough for neophyte modelers.  How cool is that?

The Coolest Thing besides being built for iPad and results comparable to full-on desktop CG results? This app’s got only 15 buttons. THAT’S a shallow learning curve for most anybody. More after the break-

A 3D modeling program with 15 buttons?

Before we go off the rails, let’s have a look under the hood. In comparison to a myriad of other 3D applications sporting dozens of menu’s and whatnot, Verto Studio 3D keeps this simple and efficient with a mere 15 buttons, it’s true. The way I see it, 15 buttons is not so much a limitation as a means of efficiency; this thing being on the iPad levels the playing field somewhat, opening the door to both pro’s and beginners alike. Pro’s using the app will find it handy, and folks new to 3D modeling need not drop a bunch of dough on a machine capable of handling even free programs to get their feet wet. That said, more folks will do something useful with the app, potentially increasing production capability for the mobile-minded. I plan to use this thing for some basic pre-viz work, on set and off, instead of relying on a laptop to do basic plotting, model builds and 3D stuff which would benefit from a rotational viewpoint/ multiple camera angles.  Savvy?

Getting back into the program itself,  users just set a mode and start working with an object using the standard iPad taps, swipes, twirls and pinching actions to modify, manipulate and tweak. Feeling ambitious? Create more objects and add ’em to the work space! There’s even a terrain generator to play with. Cool, I say.

With all this creative modeling in action, a secondary window allows for precise control over each tool via an onscreen keyboard while keeping the work area clear.  Onboard controls include the standard 3D complement; Object selection, pan, rotate, scale, vertex editing and multi-camera angle. Grouping mode enables simultaneous movement of several objects in a scene. You can even import wire mesh models (OBJ files) and texture map objects.

Dynamic Lighting

Light up those  handsome objects with four choices of lighting modes (Highlight, Emitted, Diffuse and of course, Ambient). Controls allow precise manipulation of lighting positions, direction as well as intensity.  Nice!

IMHO, Micheal L. Farrell’s Verto Studio 3D is a step up from iTracer 3D; but have a look for yourself. I’m hoping to give Verto Studio 3D a workout on an upcoming project, in as much as creating virtual sets and spaces on the fly for some pre-vizualization stuff.  I’ll see if it might fill in some gaps (in the absence of my laptop) as I’m on the road, on set, etc. Confidence is high, Capt’n.

Got anything to add?

Verto Studio 3D on iTunes

Verto Studio 3D Web page

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